Friday, 10 August 2018

Is a ban on the Burka wrong?

Image result for ban the burka

After recent comments about Muslim burka wearing women looking like 'letter boxes' or even bank robbers, from an UK Politician, would deaf agree, wearing these facial coverings, IS an actual abusing of deaf people's right to 'read' other people's faces/lips, thus, wearers are by default, are not complying with the UK or deaf and disabled access laws, and it isn't a case of religious intolerance, or, men telling women what to wear either?  

Online argument supporting an outright ban in the UK feel it is necessary to ensure people can be identified properly, and they are who they say they are, as,  various bank, border controls are having issue identifying the customers wearing them. Leading Islamic Imams in the UK say the wearing of the veil, is a 'choice' not a rule, so asking for facial proof isn't, religious intolerance as they claim.  It suggests women are hiding their own faces by choice too,and not as media stated because men are telling them they must.

SKY TV was in furore yesterday when a presenter claimed burka wearing was a right to hide facial disfigurement. Can parents of children in schools demand the removal too, as this can frighten young children?

For all Deaf?

1. International Week of the Deaf and International Day of Sign Languages from World Federation of the Deaf on Vimeo.

Maybe not with no captions, no text narrative, no feedback option, and no international-sign translations! Is anyone watching?

More sign at this hospital?


Two workers at Worcestershire Acute Hospitals have started an initiative to teach sign language to staff.

Steven Hartman, who is a British Sign Language tutor, and Rev David Southall, the Chaplain, are running a 10-week course in British Sign Language for hospital staff.

British Sign Language (BSL) is used by 50,000 people in the UK and our Worcestershire hospitals see frequent visits from deaf patients for whom BSL is their first language.

BSL was recognised as a language in its own right by the UK Government in 2003 and it involves the movement of the hands, body, face and head.  Many thousands of people who are not deaf also use BSL, either because they have deaf relatives or as a result of some contact with the British deaf community.

[?]  No proof provided. Why would HEARING rely on sign at a hospital? (Unless the medicos have insisted relatives do a qualified interpreter's job for free!). How many DEAF attend that hospital? and what is the awareness of deaf that do not sign? They are left to it?  'Deaf' awareness is not deaf or hearing loss awareness, it is about a minority who sign not the majority that do not. 

50,000 is an alleged number, not a proven statistic and one doubts they all go to that hospital, even the BDa promo area doesn't quote that figure, we do wish people who want to provide help to deaf at least researched what their needs were, and not quote dubious stats instead.

To date, not a single UK Hospital has responded to a request for statistics for deaf/HoH lip-readers or text users, why?  because there is no provision at all?


Baby hears Mum for first time...


So ATR disputes 'White' influences on CI's (Deaf Racists?).  Have anti-CI deaf now lost the plot entirely?

An adorable baby boy whose reaction to hearing his mother's voice for the first time after being fitted with cochlear implants went viral charmed viewers on This Morning on Thursday. 

 Alex Denman, who was born deaf, became an online star when his mother Jen, from Liverpool, shared footage of her saying 'hello, it's mummy,' to her baby boy following the procedure - prompting him to break out into a beautiful wide smile. Jen appeared on ITV's This Morning where she spoke about the magical moment, filmed in July, while baby Alex snuggled on her lap, and viewers took to Twitter to gush over the sweet five-month-old tot and his 'adorable' grin. 

Tuesday, 7 August 2018

Managing calls from those with hearing loss issues.

Hate Crime: At the Pub



And, at the Bus stop.

There are other videos that advise on hate crime in other areas on the same site.

Smart Energy for deaf.

Limping Chicken attempts to censor ATR?

To prevent challenges to a blog by John Walker promoting the advantages of a BSL/GCSE that was so misreported in BSL media,  ATR had to contact the education minister to clarify.  ATR had to publish statistics to clarify the ones deaf activism deliberately distorted, they seem determined to prevent deaf people from knowing the truth.  Aka tell a lie, or distort the truth long enough, people will believe it.

Many pro-GCSE/BSL posters accused ATR of being anti-deaf and anti-sign, as well as stupid, and 'doesn't understand', to suggest diminished awareness or even ignorance.  I am assuming therefore being deaf for near 50 years a passable signer and having born-deaf partner accounts for that. (Not that they are judging ATR or anything!).

Image result for quit the bullshitATR reproduces both comments sent to Limping Chicken, for open perusal.  

Background:  LC is a blog/ website supported by 33 charities and run by people who make a living from dependent sign users.  Is it not in their financial interests to ensure deaf don't move out of the straightjacket culture/sign is putting them in?  

When will these people stop pimping the Deaf and cease treating them as a 'captive market' who can only benefit by THEIR patronisations?  Deaf did not dump a patronising system/social service set up, to then rely on a  patronising set up from charity and 'peers' instead. No matter how much it is dressed up as 'deaf helping each other',  or 'deaf know each other best..' BSL/Culture is now a lucrative financial living for the more able deaf who would otherwise struggle like everyone else.  

Sign/culture is now a commodity to be exploited and the higher the profile of those, the more money and kudos is being made, not that 63% of the deaf with no work have benefitted, only hearing and these 'Deaf' have.

Check out the backgrounds and see for yourself.  Charities are opposed by most Limping chicken contributors everywhere but ON that site, they don't bite the hand that feeds, hypocrites. We then realise it is just a cynical ploy to increase audiences for the blog,  a system ATR is well known for challenging.

Comment #'1

The key terminology Mr Walker uses is 'potential' support for it, he knows no such agreement has been announced..  Nick Gibbs has put it 'on the table' for years and will forget about it, deaf areas need to stop flooding online with claims Mr Gibbs has accepted such a  class he hasn't, and as such a class needs a written component, deaf can't (Or won't), comply.  Attempts to use culture to bypass the national curriculm rules, are unlikely to succeed. Notwithstanding classes would have to be centralised. children commuted to, and classes staffed by qualified professionals, the staff do not currently exist or being trained up, and it is LA areas would allow classes in its 25,000 schools where there may not be a single deaf student in them.  The real question is what purpose is an advanced BSL lesson in terms of deaf gain?   We live in a hearing-speaking world based on literacy in English not a deaf one off on some tangent of its own.

Comment #2. (Not included at this time).

I can well understand all BSL's together but they are failing to face the reality, the DoE will NOT ecourage BSL in schools as any stand alone format, it won't help the deaf child in a hearing world.  They have a duty to enable the deaf child to succeed and cope,  OUTSIDE a deaf world not just function within it.  Deaf school education was wiped out because they did that.  The deaf community has held back the deaf child too long and its time to stand aside and let them learn what they need to learn.  

They are more concerned in ensuring the next batch of disenfranchised martyrs to their cause, than empowering the deaf child to succeed. The smoke screen of suggested 'advantages'  and cultural excuses, don't bear scrutiny, and I have seen NO real proof children have demanded this, I have seen a lot of deaf activism that has.  

My letter to the minister hopefully will silence this misinformation for good, he has already declared sometimes/never to think about it, reality. Further facts state no one who signs is identified via health areas either, so it all comes from deaf biased charities.  Who themselves have virtually NO DEAF grass root memberships, check the stats yourself. AOHL disputes BDA findings and figures too.  It's an online campaign not a grass root one.  Can we take credibility from Messrs Walker and Co, who make a living from dependent BSL users?

Monday, 6 August 2018

CryptoDeaf responds to ATR...

Unrealistic Expectations and So Many Lies GDJ / Pixabay A total immersion approach to BSL is the answer? Some facts BSL campaigners distort when talking about educational approaches. E.G. ‘Facts and figures.’ (Source the BBC).

(1) There are about 11 million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing.

I believe ATR gave the best response to this section on his blog on blogspot whos blog post, in particular, I’m utilizing from his picked sections of the source to rebut with also my own arguments.  His response to it is below.

[Never validated. No statistical analysis has ever been done, that defines loss, it is impossible and falls foul of the Data protection law, and is cross-related to disability stats, the majority of ‘deaf’ stats tend to only emerge from deaf charity bases (So with obvious bias), who don’t have resources to validate, but are USED as valid resources because the system doesn’t know either. AOHL puts the figures at 9m, including 3m who never use a hearing aid. BDA stats have doubled year on year without any validity, to currently  over 90,000 deaf signers, 6 times an increase from 15,000 who stated in a national census of actual use and twice the number registered by health systems, such stats are  unquotable as accurate.]

This is all to unfortunately done in the United States as well, often times inflating the number of deaf and it’s need for ASL by including even people who don’t rely on signing at all either because of residual hearing with lip reading or due to cochlear implants which I’ve spoken about before on how it’s not really child abuse to give your child the CI but it is child abuse to not give them it.

Those involved in Deaf Culture have a vested interest in making their small minority appear much larger than it really is in order to obtain special funding and services for themselves out of fear of their culture of heavy reliance on disability finances, interpreters and the like dying out, which is should.  Deaf culture is a parasitic culture and it’s overall attitude is quite toxic.  Due to being toxic enough to run most deaf and hard of hearing people out, they have to inflate their numbers in order to continue to seem relevant, but reality is they’re just like dinosaur media trying to cling desperately to legacy models instead of adapting to the times.

(2) There are more than 48,000 deaf children in the UK – 41,261 in England, 2,374 in Wales, 2,942 in Scotland and 1,497 in Northern Ireland.

Like before, it is automatically assuming everyone that is deaf signs, which is clearly not the case.  While I can sign, I largely prefer not to, especially not with ASL nor BSL as I see them both as vastly inferior languages.  The reason I see them that way is because it’s language syntax and structure feels like it was created by a bunch of uneducated children, then I actually researched things further and found out that it was created by a bunch of uneducated children.  Go figure.  No wonder it’s inferior to Signed English.

So why don’t deafs like myself sign?  Because I’m very accustomed to using English and like I said, ASL and BSL both are inferior.  So since if I’m going to sign I’ll be using Signed English and no interpreter knows Signed English, it’s pointless for me to bother with it so therefore, I stick with oralism, which is the way of the future anyway.  It’s incorrect to assume that just because they’re deaf, they must also be sign users.

(3) BSL is the first or preferred language of about 70,000 deaf people in the UK.

Another inflated number, again this is also done heavily in the United States in which even ASL interpreters are added into the number of “deaf” even though they’re clearing regular hearing folk that just happen to also have an education in sign language.  Much of the times these stats get inflated further by adding in people who are moderate to profoundly hard of hearing just to make the number larger.

This is no different than making a new word like “Femicide” and defining it as “When a woman is killed because she is a woman usually by a man” and then throwing in the list of victims of “femicide” who are both male and female children and grown men who were killed by their mothers/wife.  I’ve actually seen this, it’s quite sad people lie in order to inflate numbers so severely, but if they have an agenda to push, no lie is too great and no one particular group is too hearing to be lumped in with the number of deaf in statistics.

Sign language has no written component. Deaf people can only use sign language to communicate face to face.

As ATR Said [WITH each other, and not with others without support elsewhere, so not enabling deaf people to cope in a hearing world, and inhibiting deaf children’s opportunity, and ability to be included.] This is why I consider it child abuse to not give your deaf child a cochlear implant.  Disregard what culturally deaf people have to say in the matter, they’re literally wanting to stunt your kids future for the sake of keeping their parasitic and toxic culture alive.  (hurr isn’t that hate speech against the deaf?) I am deaf numb nuts!  I’ve been deaf since I was a small child.

This means that the deaf must use English or another language for reading and writing, which has become increasingly important for business and communication with the advent of computers and the Internet.

It’s not that it’s increasingly important, it’s that it’s absolutely required.  If you can’t communicate verbally, lip read, etc, and you aren’t literate in English, there isn’t a prayer’s chance in fictional hell that you’ll be able to make it in the real world and will have to rely on a parasitic culture in order to get by, meaning you’ll have to pass up on millions of cultures in favor of a really terrible one without a choice in the matter.  IN order to mingle with people of other cultures, you’re sadly going to have to use an interpreter when you could’ve just learned English and gotten a CI and learn to speak and listen and be set out on your own without reliance on others and be part of a multitude of beautiful cultures.

Can’t read English in an English speaking country? Your educated is stunted, you’re ability to learn new tasks is excessively hindered and you’re not able to properly accomplish tasks in the mainstream job market.  This is a simple fact.

Deaf children who are given cochlear implants at a young age, learn to speak and go through mainstream education have a statistical IQ average between 95-110, roughly on par with their hearing peers.  Deaf children aren’t given cochlear implants at a young age and are instead sent through a Deaf School have a statistical IQ average between 65-78.

Psychological studies as referenced via Jordan Peterson in his lecture about IQ and job abilities show the lower the IQ of an individual, the less likely they are to be able to produce meaningful and fulfilling employment and have extreme difficulty in learning new tasks.

All deaf people are bilingual IF they use sign language in addition to lip-reading.

As I stated earlier, I was born profoundly hard of hearing and been deaf since I was 10.  I speak English, Spanish and some German as verbal languages but I’m illiterate in both Spanish and German.  I also can sign but have a strong preference against using it.  But that’s not what’s being references from the article.  Hm.  It’s almost like they’re trying to pass off as being able to lip read some as being bilingual, which isn’t the case at all.  That’s like saying “Oh yeah I’m bilingual because I can speak English and I know a few phrases in German but can’t really pronounce them well.”  So the people they’re referencing in the BBC article are still very sign dependant.

As with any second language, sign language has its own unique history, culture and grammatical structure, making the translation from signing to writing in standard English a significant challenge.

This sounds more like an argument against the likes of ASL and BSL and a strong argument for Signed English instead.  Unfortunately in deaf schools the children are taught using inferior language that’s going to confuse them when they try learning English and have an ass backwards structure of sentencing and syntax that it ends up literally stunting their educational growth, probably why their average IQ is much lower than mainstreamed deafs who don’t learn sign until much later in life.

Deaf Schools aren’t teaching children well enough due to the use of ASL or BSL instead of the better Signed English resulting in them being unable to really properly integrate into the mainstream society and necessitates that they isolate themselves in a cultural bubble due to being unable to cope with the world at large.  As ATR puts it on his blog. “Would you teach your child to speak French if he lived in Germany, assuming the interpreters will just provide the rest?”  Or as I’ll reword it “Would you live in America with your American baby and only teach the child to speak Japanese and assume he’ll be just fine?”

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures.

Uh…. duh.  Nah, this whole time everyone in the world thought sign language was a series of clicks of the tongue and eye blinks. Hurr.

This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson’s or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language. Having a broken arm or carrying a bag of groceries can, for a deaf person, limit communication. The amount of light in a room also affects the ability to communicate using sign language.

Mhm, wouldn’t it be better to have a cochlear implant so you can avoid signing with arthritis or parkinsons and be able to communicate with people in the dark?  Don’t know about you but I would kinda prefer to be able to have a meaningful conversation with someone on a long road trip and not have to have them take their hands off the wheel, turn on the car’s interior lights in the middle of the night of the long journey just to sign something to me.  Soooooo they just made the argument for why oralism is superior and why deaf people really should be getting cochlear implants if and when we can.

I don’t think that was their intention, but it’s certainly the message they ended up providing.

SOURCE

UK Education Minister asked to clarify BSL claims

Image result for Nick Gibbs educationFollowing a wave of declarations online by Deaf BSL users and TV channels/newspapers stating the Minister has agreed to establish a GCSE class in education, ATR has sent a letter demanding clarity, in the light he has NOT agreed in Parliament to establish such a  class, only to 'consider' it.

The letter to Nick Gibbs, (Dept of Education):-

"Can the minister clarify it HASN'T approved a GCSE class for the BSL (Sign language) user?  Our understanding is the request has been 'put on the table' and 'may' be discussed in a future parliament.  

I.E. Assuming, that the said class follows the national curriculum.  We have read the Dept of Education HAS already approved such a class, via Channel 5/BBC news and various national papers. We would appreciate a denial, that this has been agreed and/or a clarification, if it has."

Sunday, 5 August 2018

Unrealistic expectations and lies, damn lies etc...

Related imageA total immersion approach to BSL is the answer?  Some facts BSL campaigners distort when talking about educational approaches.  E.G.
'Facts and figures.' (Source the BBC).

(1)  There are about 11 million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing.

[Never validated. No statistical analysis has ever been done, that defines loss, it is impossible and falls foul of the Data protection law, and is cross-related to disability stats, the majority of 'deaf' stats tend to only emerge from deaf charity bases (So with obvious bias), who don't have resources to validate, but are USED as valid resources because the system doesn't know either. AOHL puts the figures at 9m, including 3m who never use a hearing aid.  BDA stats have doubled year on year without any validity, to currently  over 90,000 deaf signers, 6 times an increase from 15,000 who stated in a national census of actual use and twice the number registered by health systems, such stats are  unquotable as accurate.]

(2)  There are more than 48,000 deaf children in the UK - 41,261 in England, 2,374 in Wales, 2,942 in Scotland and 1,497 in Northern Ireland.

[No statistic says they are DEAF and use sign, (or need it, CI users are on the rise), it comes under 'hearing loss', this is deaf activism 'suggesting' all deaf sign again, also, Wales e.g. have NO deaf schools.].

(3) BSL is the first or preferred language of about 70,000 deaf people in the UK.

[This conflicts with 'fact' (2), suggesting 50% of hearing also rely on BSL as well, and have been added to actual deaf stats.  The BDA the BSL mouthpiece recently went as far as 90,000 deaf, with no proof supplied, it's all 'think of a  number...', who can disprove it, with no effective survey ever taking place?]

BSL is not a translation of English - it has its own linguistics and very different grammatical structures to English. The UK government acknowledged it as an official language in 2003.

[But did NOT, and still have not,  approved widespread usage in deaf education since, they simply recognised deaf use sign via a European declaration of minority language recognitions along with 11 others in Europe, the Britsh Deaf Association used the declaration, to suggest the UK had already accepted BSL in schools, to boost BSL campaigns.. (As they still try to suggest via recent BSL GCSE Campaigns), but again the UK Dept of Education is doing little more than paying 'lip-service' to it and has said no recognition or inclusions in this current parliament..]

Sign language has no written component. Deaf people can only use sign language to communicate face to face. 

[WITH each other, and not with others without support elsewhere, so not enabling deaf people to cope in a hearing world, and inhibiting deaf children's opportunity, and ability to be included.]

This means that the deaf must use English or another language for reading and writing, which has become increasingly important for business and communication with the advent of computers and the Internet. 

[It's essential not 'increasingly important' if you aren't English literate you have no way to learn what you need to, or advance or work properly, 'illiteracy' becomes the barrier].

All deaf people are bilingual IF they use sign language in addition to lip-reading. 

[Not, and poorly explained properly, even lip-reading ability may not suggest any effective oral/written response, so still explicitly sign dependent.]

As with any second language, sign language has its own unique history, culture and grammatical structure, making the translation from signing to writing in standard English a significant challenge.

[All the more reason ENGLISH should be their first signed language, education is not just there to promote a culture in isolation, but to enable deaf to move in and out of it.  It's not a system just designed so deaf can socialise with each other, but that's all they are doing with it. E.G. would you teach your child to speak French if he lived in Germany, assuming the interpreters will provide the rest?]

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures. 

This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson's or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language. Having a broken arm or carrying a bag of groceries can, for a deaf person, limit communication. The amount of light in a room also affects the ability to communicate using sign language.