Friday, 29 March 2019

Deaf/Disabled to get £1130 a week to work.


From 1 April 2019, workers can claim up to £59,200 annually from the Government to help support them in the workplace
And wages, WOW!  There is a catch but can you spot it?

Million of employees with long-term health conditions and disabilities will be able to benefit from up to £59,200 a year to assist them at work, with the grant increasing next month. 

From 1 April 2019, those who qualify will be able to claim up to £59,200 annually from the Government's Access to Work benefit to help pay for additional support that they may need in the workplace. Access to Work provides financial support to ensure someone's disability or health condition doesn't hold them back at work. This includes providing adjustable desks, special IT equipment and voice-recognition software. From 1 April 2019, workers can claim up to £59,200 annually from the Government to help support them in the workplace

A spokesperson for the Department for Work and Pensions said: 'Access to Work provides tailored support to thousands across the country, ensuring a disability or health condition is not a barrier to achieving someone's career aspirations. 'By extending this grant even more people can benefit from this personalised scheme, and more disabled people can thrive in the workplace.' 

A spokesperson from the DWP said: 'The cap has been updated in line with the annual survey of hours and earnings published by the Office for National Statistics. 'The cap is set at two times the median gross annual earnings for full-time employees.' Disability facts and figures · There are over 11 million people with long term illnesses, impairment or disability in the UK · Impairments that affect mobility, lifting or carrying are the most common. 

Prevalence of disability rises with age. Around six per cent of children are disabled compared to 16 per cent of working age adults and 45 per cent of adults over State Pension Age (66). It's claimed that now even more people will be able to benefit, especially those from the deaf community who can get British Sign Language (BSL) interpreters through the scheme. 

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